archiemcphee:

Toronto, Ontario-based artist Ruth Oosterman collaborates with her two-year-old daughter Eve to create imaginative paintings that feel as though they’ve been lifted from the pages of a fantastic series of storybooks we’re now dying to read. Here Oosterman describe their process:

As all of our collaborations start, my two year old creates her own sketch with an ink pen which I then use to turn into a watercolor painting. The sketch is completely her own with no instruction given from me, I simply use her creativity to inspire me to create a painting.

Oosterman says that she can usually either discern a picture hidden inside Eve’s sketch or her daughter will have chatted with her about what she was drawing. But sometimes there is no conteext andshe has to let her own imagination run with it.

I try to work quickly and let imagination and play take root into the painting rather than taking it to seriously, this way I can encourage Eve’s contribution without making it to “grownup.”

Visit Ruth Oosterman’s blog and her YouTube channel to check out more of her wonderful collaborations with young Eve.

Prints of some of their creations are available via the Eve’s Imagination Etsy shop.

[via Bored Panda]

dek-says-so:

abbyjean:

Charts from OKCupid, showing how straight women and men rate each other based on ages. For women, the men they find most attractive are roughly their own age. For men, the women they find most attractive are roughly the same age - 20 to 23 - regardless of the age of the man. (538)

Good fucking Christ.

(via ilovecharts)

archiemcphee:

It’s been over a year since we last checked in on the beautiful work of Russian paper artist and graphic designer Yulia Brodskaya (previously featured here), who creates vibrant, lyrical illustrations using quilling or paper filigree as well as other sculptural techniques. Brodskaya has been experimenting with paper quilling for over six years and now, in addition to progressing with her personal artwork, creates high-profile commissions for people and companies such as fashion designer Issey Miyake, Godiva chocolates, an Paramount films.

Visit Yulia Brodskaya’s website to check out more of her work, both professional and personal. She’s also featured in the wonderful new book Paper Cut: An Exploration Into the Contemporary World of Papercraft Art and Illustration compiled by paper artist Owen Gildersleeve [Buy on Amazon].

[via Colossal]

stopthatimp:

You’d have to get rid of “male gaze” too, I guess. “Objectifying gaze” for both, maybe? With context telling you what is being objectified.

maybe!!! placing the emphasis on who is being objectified rather than who’s doing the objectifying? it just drives me crazy to see everyone being like “outlander is for women!” yes. true. and that’s awesome. but women do not, universally, find men attractive. it’s for SOME women. WHICH IS STILL AWESOME BUT THE DISTINCTION MATTERS TO ME BC I’M SELF CENTERED

SURE. I think what’s appealing to a lot of people about “female gaze” is that it emphasizes how relatively rarely women’s POVs are centered in pop culture, but it’s definitely not an accurate or inclusive term.

philamuseum:

More Art Monday: Although sapphires come in a range of colors, deep blue is often most prized. Happy birthday, sapphire babies.

Pendant, late 19th century, America

Winter Chaos, Blizzard,” 1909, Marsden Hartley

Woman’s Dress: Bodice, Overskirt, and Underskirt, c. 1875, French

Chair, designed 1941–42, designed by Jens Risom, made by Knoll

Ring, c. 1950, America

Hydrangeas Spring Song,” 1976, by Alma Thomas

Man’s Dragon Robe (Mang Pao), early 20th century, China

Plate, c. 1825, made by Henshall and Company, decoration after Thomas Birch